WEIGHT LOSS LED RETIRED DESIGNER TO SHARE HEALTHY FOOD SECRETS

Kristine M. Kierzek, Special to the Journal SentinelPublished | August 1, 2017

Excerpted...

Q. What do you hope people take away from your story?

A. You have the power to heal your life. Let’s stay in the kitchen and help each other. This book is my personal struggle and learning. Many people came out of the woodwork to help me. Now it’s my turn to see if I can help others.

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COOKBOOK AUTHOR CREATES HEALTHY INDIAN RECIPES AND DONATES ROYALTIES TO FOODCORPS

By Ashley Turk, Assistant to the CEO | Jul 25, 2017

Excerpted from FoodCorps blog post. Click logo to read entire post.

…We are lucky to have a champion who remasters recipes that have meant so much to her and shares them to make the world a healthier place. Curt Ellis, FoodCorps co-founder and CEO, wrote the foreword for the book. His words sum up nicely what I felt leafing through Deepa’s pages: “Deepa’s story takes us further: to a world where amazing things are possible, and to a worldview where we are empowered to not just follow recipes for job, love, and wellbeing, but to create them.

 

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BOOKLIST June 27, 2017

In between her secrets (e.g., read labels carefully; maple syrup, for instance, might include sugar) and educational asides (did you know that mace is ground-up nutmeg shells?), she helps readers learn a new culinary language, with such choices as a masala omelet, ginger cabbage slaw, crackling okra, and aromatic fish in parchment.

—Barbara Jacobs

 

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY June 19, 2017

Indian food without fragrant basmati or fresh-from-the-tandoor naan? Thomas had an epiphany about the role these sources of simple carbohydrates played in her husband’s diabetes after a doctor recommended that he adopt a low-carb diet, and she shares that epiphany and the recipes it prompted in this solid, informative cookbook. The results of Thomas and her husband’s dietary changes came quickly: the couple lost more than 20 pounds each in the first six months of their new “non-diet,” and eventually her husband no longer needed to take insulin. Thomas suggests grains, such a gingered faro with dried fruit and nuts, and eggs, as in a tofu and asparagus scramble. Recipes are fresh and simple, showing the influence of the subcontinent and California. Spicy keema beef, a holdover go-to from the couple’s Stanford student days, is a standout: ground beef and a mix of fresh vegetables and 14 spices are served with an Italian-inspired “New Indian Gremolata,” a versatile flavor bomb of chopped cilantro, mint, garlic, and jalapeño peppers. Engaging personal stories combined with artfully scattered notes and hints make this book reminiscent of the earliest Moosewood Cookbook in its tone and inviting narrative.